The similarities between Creole and Cajun cuisines are due to the French heritage of both cultures, and the new ingredients to which French cooking techniques were applied by Creoles and by Cajuns. Both types of cooking have culinary roots in France, with a nod to Spain, Africa, and Native America, and to a lesser degree to the West Indies, Germany, Ireland, and Italy. Both cultures take their food very seriously, and love to cook, eat, and entertain.

 

It is said that a Creole feeds one family with three chickens and a Cajun feeds three families with one chicken. Another major difference between Creole and Cajun food is in the type of roux used as the base of sauces, stews, soups, and other savory dishes. Creole roux is made from butter and flour (as in France), while Cajun roux is made from lard or oil and flour. This is partly due to the scarcity of dairy products in some areas of Acadiana (Acadia + Louisiana) when Cajun cuisine was being developed. Gumbo is perhaps the signature dish of both cuisines. Creole gumbo has a tomato base and is more of a soup, while Cajun gumbo has a roux base and is more of a stew.

Cajun

ˈkājən/

Cajun cuisine (French: Cuisine cadienne) [kɥizin kadjɛn]. This style of cooking is named for the French-speaking Acadian people deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana, USA., especially with reference to their folk music (typically featuring the concertina, accordion, and fiddle) or spicy cuisine.

Cre·ole

ˈkrēˌōl/

Louisiana Creole cuisine is recognized as a unique style of cooking, which makes use of the “Holy Trinity” (in this case, chopped celery, bell peppers, and onions), but has a great variety of European, French, Caribbean, African, and American influences. Gumbo is a traditional Creole dish.

CONTACT US

info@louisianapurchase.ca  | (780) 420-6779 | 10320 111 St NW, Edmonton, AB

RESERVE NOW

>>

>>

JOIN THE TEAM > EMAIL US AT

work@louisianapurchase.ca